Games and Learning: A Review of A Theory of Fun

A few weeks ago a colleague sent an email to the faculty asking about banning students’ use of electronic devices during their recess time. This email was in response to a rainy indoor recess, where several students fired up their devices and started playing Minecraft. He was concerned about how these games might be impacting their social interaction and learning. The email inspired several other faculty members to share their support of a ban on electronics. Ever since then, I’ve been questioning the relationship between games and learning. More specifically I’ve been reading the book A Theory of Fun for...

Digital Literacy Definitions Are Neither True Nor False…

Words can be slippery. Jargon is used to obscure or elevate language (see: Education Jargon Generator) Terms are applied too broadly or misappropriated (see: Gardner Campbell tries to recapture the idea of “open” in MOOCs, KQED’s Project-based Learning article) Words may only have meaning to the person saying them  (for a brilliant example see: Monty Python and more Monty Python-slightly NSWF, also the ds106 Daily Create Assignment by Guilia Forsythe ). As part of our #etmooc task, I needed to define digital literacy. Fortuitously, I stumbled across this Twitter conversation that highlighted the problematic nature of definitions (as an aside, if anyone knows a...

Flavor of the Month

I enjoy hearing people laud and bemoan the latest gadgets. The flavor of the month is Google’s Nexus 7. This 7″ tablet is cheap, fast and the first Android tablet without major usability issues. Already the tech community seems to be lining up on one side or another to either praise or bury this device. It is difficult to separate many of these devices from the expectations that come with them. And whether or not those expectations align with your own.